News from the 40th Senate District race

5

That’s the one where Republican Assemblyman Greg Ball and Democratic Westchester County Legislator Mike Kaplowitz are going at it to replace state Sen. Vincent Leibell.

Sen. Charles Schumer came out today to endorse Kaplowitz. From the latter’s campaign:

Speaking in Bailey Park (in Somers), Sen. Schumer emphasized the need to send Kaplowitz to Albany to achieve real property tax relief and job creation for New Yorkers.

Schumer said: “I am honored to endorse Mike Kaplowitz. As a  homeowner and parent of two children who went through public schools, Mike understands the problems facing middle-class New Yorkers. As a certified financial planner and local legislator, Mike has developed a skill-set and expertise that will cut wasteful spending and save taxpayers their hard-earned money. Mike’s arsenal of ideas will provide residents of the Hudson Valley and throughout New York with the property tax relief and job creation they need and deserve. I look forward to working with Mike in the future, both at home and in Washington.”

The rally capped off a busy week of endorsements for Kaplowitz. Kaplowitz’ candidacy was endorsed by Attorney General and gubernatorial candidate Andrew Cuomo and U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, earlier in the week. Kaplowitz has demonstrated deep and diverse support, and clearly has the momentum heading into election day next Tuesday.

Kaplowitz said, “I am extremely grateful to have the support of Sen. Schumer, a leader who has truly delivered for New Yorkers. He is a tireless and fierce advocate for those who want to see lower taxes and quality jobs in the Hudson Valley. I am excited to work with Sen. Schumer and together, we will acheive the results Hudson Valley residents need and deserve.

Then, the Ball campaign has a rally planned for tomorrow:

Greg Edwards, Candidate for Lt. Governor, Joins Greg Ball’s “Vote the Ins Out” Rally
Tax Revolt & “Take It Back” March Scheduled for Saturday in Carmel


Candidate for Lt. Governor Greg Edwards will join Greg Ball and candidates from throughout the Hudson Valley in Carmel on Saturday for the “Vote the Ins Out” rally and “March for Reform.”

Greg Ball’s Campaign for State Senate will host a “Vote the Ins Out” rally on the steps of the Historic Putnam County Courthouse on the afternoon of Saturday, October 30. Ball previously hosted the historic April 15 Tea Party MTA Tax Revolt at this same site, drawing an audience of 1,500 people that shut down the hamlet of Carmel. Ball also held the nation’s first Tea Party on the Courthouse steps in 2008 to protest and successfully defeat a proposed 60+% increase to the Putnam County Property Tax Levy.

“The silent majority is silent no more, and on November 2 the Ins will hear with resounding defeat that we’re saying Hell No to the Status Quo,” Ball said.

Jim Coleman will return to once again emcee this Putnam County Tea Party rally, entering the crowd throughout the day to ask, “What are we going to do about it?”

Invited speakers for the Rally including candidate for the 99th Assembly, Dr. Steve Katz (R, I – Mohegan Lake), candidate for the 90th Assembly, Bill Gouldman (R, C – Putnam Valley), and candidate for Putnam County Executive MaryEllen Odell (I-Carmel). Assemblyman Robert Castelli (R, C – Goldens Bridge) and candidate for Congress in the 17th District, Tony Mele, will also be invited to return to the Courthouse to speak. Additional invited speakers include Ed Kowalski of 9/11 Families for a Secure America, Homeland Security Expert Mike Cutler, “Rob the Bus Driver,” Kurt Colucci of the Westchester Taxpayers Association, Ed Ciffone of the United Taxpayers of Yorktown, 10-year-old Tea Party Activist Michael Buffone, and Robin Murphy of thegrassroots organization Stop Tax Hike Mike.

The Ball Campaign has reserved the Sheetmetal Workers Meeting Hall on Starr Ridge Rd in Brewster in the event of inclement weather.

The details for OCTOBER 30’s Rally Are:
WHAT: Vote the Ins Out Rally

WHEN: Saturday, October 30
Noon-2PM

WHERE:   Historic Putnam County Courthouse
40 Gleneida Ave
Carmel, NY

Share.

About Author

5 Comments

  1. Odell is really showing herself to be a right wing extremist, I find it hard to believe that demomocrat or republican would vote for her. Odell is so far out to the right it is scary. Odell, Paladino and Ball are all one in the same.

  2. ISchumer is also honored to also endorse John Sampson, Malcolm Smith and the rest of those who have been mentioned in the AEG Scandal.

    His former Campaign “BRIAN” was Hank Morris the mastermind of the PensionGate Scandal

    JUST say NO to the Democ”RAT”ic Cover Up Gang of Schumer, Cuomo, DiNapoli, and the WATACHDOG AG “Eric Schneiderman Ruff Ruff

    Before there was the “Oracle at Delphi” there was Count Vampire J. Machiavelli

    VJ Machiavelli

  3. How about Ball comparing himself to Malcolm X? What’s that about? Is he that extreme that no one will ever work with him because he basically wants to kill everyone who does not agree with him? That’s a sick puppy right there. And one without a plan to actually make a difference for the people.

  4. American dream... in India on

    This US businessman believes his work in India gives a cutting edge to his political ambitions back home

    Greg Ball – mixing business with politics.

    “Ilove Chennai. Whenever I am here, people ask me why I am not visiting Goa or Bangalore. But I enjoy being here,” says 28-year-old Greg Ball, Vice-President – Marketing, Exceed International, a US-based real estate development company with presence in India, Turkey and Tunisia.

    The company’s Indian operations are located in Chennai. A fourth-generation real estate development company, Exceed wants to work on large township projects and hopes to bring American standards to Chennai. “We want to bring the American dream to India,” says Ball.

    The Indian office was set up initially as a support centre for the US operations. “We realised the opportunities in India, which exceed those in the US,” he says. The company has $3 million worth of projects in the pipeline in India. “If anything, the American office now supports the Indian office,” he says.

    Ball met Charlie Miles, President of Exceed International, at the military academy in the US. It was his loyalty to his good friend Miles that brought him to Exceed. “I love business, but politics is my passion. There’s nothing else that I wanted to do,” he says. His ultimate political ambition is to become the Governor of New York State!

    Ball narrates an incident from his childhood that sowed the seeds for his passion. “My godmother was personal secretary to Joseph Kennedy, the father of Jack Kennedy. As an infant I had cat-scratch fever, and Jean Kennedy- Smith, Jack Kennedy’s sister, asked my parents to take me to a hospital. When my parents said they couldn’t afford it, she said she would take care of everything. And, within five minutes, there were 10 doctors around me. I think those little interactions that I had as a kid with that family in particular showed me how well power could be used.”

    He feels that people should use their abilities to impact others positively, because there is both good and evil in this world. “Evil exists, and we have to fight it at every turn.”

    And his military regimentation helps him do so. “How to work, and get people to do what they don’t want to do or like. that’s an art, especially in the business world. Leading people at intrinsic levels to accomplish great things, and tap into their full potential is what leadership is all about, whether in uniform or behind the desk in a suit and tie.”

    His stint in the military academy helped him learn to listen. “I am very comfortable sitting in a room knowing that I know very little and the rest know a great deal and, if I just listen I can find all the answers.”

    That’s one of the valuable aspects of leadership, he says. “At the end of the day, it’s all about fighting for your people, remaining loyal to them and taking care of them.”

    His passion for politics has led him to the New York State Assembly race. “I want to bring to the government the perspective of a businessman and a military man, and champion the cause of the average blue-collar New Yorker. not the well-to-do or the very rich and famous.”

    He feels that the State’s working families, seniors, small businessmen, and children deserve better. There are individuals, he says, who have worked hard their entire lives, made the community a better place and at the fag end of their lives have been pushed out of their homes because of higher taxes.

    If elected, he wants to “move the tax burden off the backs of the working classes, and towards big corporations and wealthy Americans.” Besides tax reforms, he wants to usher in smarter growth, fight congestion and transportation issues, improve schools, protect the environment and improve the overall quality of life.

    His energetic campaign started 17 months ahead of the September 2006 elections. “I am running against Willis Stephens, one of the most powerful men in the State. He comes from a family, which has been in politics for about 150 years. I am running a very grassroots campaign.” He goes from door to door, has already knocked on about 6,000 homes, and put about 30,000 miles in his car in six months.

    “I have gone through 4-5 pairs of shoes. I work 20 hours a day reaching as many people as possible. I call it the Shoe Leather Express,” he adds.

    Ball does not want to spend millions of dollars pushing mailers and TV ads on people, and firmly believes in connecting to people at a personal level. He has not sought funds from big corporations or lobbyists, but has a lot of individuals supporting his campaign. “There are lots of people giving small amounts of money. As a politician you have to decide where you want to stand – with the people or large multinationals and lobbyists.”

    He wants to link New York to a global economy. “A lot of people talk of outsourcing being a bad thing. In the US, sometimes we have a very insular culture. I don’t see a JP Morgan office here. I don’t even think it exists in Chennai. But it’s a huge financial institution in the US. If you sat with them and talked about opportunities here in India, you will probably have a limited discussion.”

    The reality, according to him, is that the future of the world, and even America’s financial future, rests in the hands of India. He believes that the vitality of the US as a nation will be decided by its connection to the Indian marketplace.

    As an American businessman with an experience in India, and “one who understands how to link to the global marketplace, I think the taxpayers, workers and residents of New York will benefit from a politician who understands how to grapple with the tough issues of connecting to a global economy,” he says.

    He feels that the domestic concerns of the US should not stagnate the country’s robust international policy and adds that it’s important to find out how to expand more American jobs and also develop a very strong relationship with the Indian marketplace. “As Americans, we have to begin thinking outside of the consumer economy of the US. That’s a thing of the past.”

    And this is where he feels his experience at Exceed International would help in the political arena, “because we need coordinated planning, whether it is infrastructure projects or restricting residential sprawl; we need to look more towards the next generation and communicate with all the communities in the district where we want to be 30-40 years from now.”

    As an American, he feels that his country should carefully maintain its image as a strong, yet compassionate nation. “The hearts and minds of the next generation throughout the world will be won over with our intelligence, our culture and our humanitarian capacity, not our F-15s.”

    Even as he juggles his time between work and a rigorous political campaign, he enjoys every bit of hard work and stress that come with such a busy schedule. It’s important to take care of oneself on a daily basis, learn to say no and zone out. “I enjoy what I do. If I didn’t, I would be doing something else