Cuomo names deputy education secretary

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Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced today that he has appointed David Wakelyn, who has worked for the National Governors Association since 2009, as his deputy secretary for education. At the Governors Association, Wakelyn led projects to implement education standards and provided consultation to turn around low-performing schools.

“With his extensive experience in improving the performance of schools all across the nation, David Wakelyn is the right person to help turn around our schools,” Cuomo said in a statement. “He is an expert in state policy for education, and together we will deliver results for students and families in New York.”

Wakelyn was senior policy analyst for the National Governors Association from 2005 to 2009, leading a $4 million expansion of Advanced Placement classes in six states. It increased enrollment of minority students by 89 percent and improved performance at a rate twice the national average, Cuomo said.

Before joining the association, Wakelyn was a senior associate for America’s Choice School Design. Prior to that, he was a research associate for the Wisconsin Center for Education Research. He taught math to seventh- and eighth-graders in California with Teach for America from 1990 to 1993.

He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Department of Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis in 2006. He has a master’s in public administration from the University of Wisconsin and a bachelor’s in American history and political science from Vanderbilt University.

“David Wakelyn has a proven record of improving performance in schools all across the United States, and I am confident he will deliver the same results for New York,” Gaston Caperton, president of the College Board and former West Virginia governor, said in a statement.

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  1. Cardinal Newman on

    Here’s a large part of the problem: the gentleman has a bachelor’s degree in American History and Political Science. Presumably, his PhD is in education and “policy analysis.” He taught MATH to seventh and eighth graders. Math?