Business, local government groups unveil mandate relief package

2

A coalition of business, local government and education advocates came together this morning to unveil its “Let NY Work” report, a six-point plan the groups say would make life under the state’s new property-tax cap easier.

The plan — backed by the state Business Council, Unshackle Upstate, the state School Boards Association, the Westchester County Association and seven other advocacy groups — calls for the repeal or reform of a number of laws long lamented by the business community, including the Wick’s Law and the Triborough Amendment, which continues the terms of an expired public labor contract until a new deal is reached.

The six points, as written by the coalition:

  1. Make the pension system predictable and affordable
  2. Redefine compulsory arbitration
  3. Reduce the costs of construction on public/private projects
  4. Freeze step increases when contracts expire
  5. Establish minimum health insurance contribution level for employees and retirees
  6. Prohibit new mandates

Join us live here at noon, where we’ll host a discussion with Robert Reidy, executive director of the NYS Council of State Superintendents, one of the groups backing the plan.

In the meantime, here’s Business Council Acting President Heather Briccetti unveiling the plan:

Share.

About Author

2 Comments

  1. So, if you business owners and highly paid school executives, who all have secure retirement/buyout packages, could just screw your employees and get some more tax dollars from the state in the form of subsidies and state aid, everything would be just right? While you all put in for tax breaks on your cars and expenses, right?

    Beware the guillotine. You’re either helping push it or waiting for it to arrive.

  2. When the last bourgeois is hanged, a capitalist will sell the rope. It is and always has been the name of the game worldwide and has no relationship whatsoever to Parties or political philosophy. Your guillotine functions for the king as well as the peasant, and, throughout history, goes full circle.