Cuomo taps former DA Michael Green for administration post

4

Former Monroe County District Attorney Michael Green has been tapped for a post in Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration, the governor’s office is set to announce today.

Green will serve as executive deputy commissioner of the Division of Criminal Justice Services, according to a news release obtained by Gannett’s Albany Bureau. He will also serve as senior counsel for criminal justice policy.

“With 25 years of experience as a prosecutor, Mike Green will bring valuable expertise in fighting crime and protecting New Yorkers to state government,” Cuomo said in a statement. “His knowledge and understanding of the challenges in reducing violent crime in Rochester and Monroe County will help us make communities across New York State a safer place to live.”

Green (pictured, right) was Monroe’s district attorney from 2003 through 2011. He was nominated by President Barack Obama to serve as a federal judge in the Western District of New York last year, but the Senate blocked his nomination in December.

A Democrat, Green decried partisan politics for scuttling his appointment.

Green, a Henrietta, Monroe County, native, previously served as an assistant district attorney for 17 years. He had been working in current Monroe County District Attorney Sandra Doorley’s office since January.

“Mike’s extraordinary dedication to justice and public safety made him one of the finest DAs in the state, and I know he will distinguish himself in this role as well,” Assemblyman Joseph Morelle, D-Irondequoit, Monroe County, said in a statement.

Share.

About Author

4 Comments

  1. If the Senate blocked his nomination, there must have been good reason. How about telling us what that reason was?

  2. Green’s nomination was not “blocked” by partisanship in the Senate. It was sent back to the White House without action, and the White House decided not to resubmit it. Since only Harry Reid and Chuck Schumer could send it back, and only the Obama administration could decide not to resubmit it, the “partisan” charge is hooey.

    The question is: why did Reid/Schumer send it back, and why did the WH deep six Green? If he were returning to the private sector no one would care. Since he is taking a public job, inquiring minds want (and deserve) to know.

  3. Bob, “inquiring minds [who] want to know” can — and should — read the New York Law Journal article that appeared in its December 23, 2011 issue.
    http://www.newyorklawjournal.com/PubArticleNY.jsp?id=1202536544576

    You’ll see that NYU Law School Professor Steven Gillers, a nationally recognized expert on lawyer ethics, gave an interview to the Law Journal. In that interview, he told the Law Journal that the U.S. Department of Justice sought his opinion regarding an anonymous letter it received, and a letter from Senator Grassley, prompted by the anonymous letter which claimed Green had violated ethical standards by endorsing his First Assistant District Attorney Sandra Doorley while his nomination for the federal judgeship was pending (Green had received a 17-1 vote from the Senate Judiciary Committee, but his nomination had not yet gone to the floor of the Senate for a full house vote).

    Professor Gillers reported his conclusion that Green had not acted improperly. Yet Senator Grassley’s office claimed that some problems had surfaced during the background investigation.

    Bottom line: Green’s nomination didn’t go through because of “politics”. Is it because he defected from the local Republican party to run for DA as a Democratic candidate; is it because the factionalism in the Rochester Democratic party prompted Schumer and Gillibrand to not “go to the mat” for Green? Who knows, but whatever the reasons for his failed nomination, there is no sound basis for thinking he didn’t get the judgeship because of skeletons rattling around in his closet.

    I have a lot of respect for Sean Byrne and think he’s a good guy. So I’m sorry that he’s being ousted from DCJS. But Green doesn’t deserve to be tarred by flimsy innuendo.

  4. His nomination didn’t go through because of “politics?” What else is there in the realm of “politics” that isn’t “politics?” Grip up!