Jenkins’ concession speech, Bramson’s acceptance speech at Democratic convention

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Following a run-off vote well after midnight at last night’s convention, New Rochelle Mayor Noam Bramson handily won the Westchester County Democratic Party’s nomination to run for county executive this year. Bramson received 97,950.5 votes (54 percent) to Jenkins’ 80,249 (45 percent).

Below are video excerpts from Bramson’s acceptance speech, Jenkins’  concession speech and County Democratic Chairman Reginald LaFayette’s speech urging Democrats to work together to defeat County Executive Rob Astorino, a Republican, this fall. County Legislator Bill Ryan of White Plains, received about 14,500 votes in the first round of voting.

Astorino’s campaign released a statement after Bramson was nominated last night. The Republican Party has not held its convention yet.

“We congratulate Mr. Bramson on his nomination tonight and look forward to a healthy debate in the fall election season, based on the issues,” campaign spokeswoman Jessica Proud said. “County Executive Astorino has delivered on the promises he made to Westchester voters four years ago — like his no tax increase pledge — and he is laying the groundwork for a healthy and economically vibrant Westchester going forward.  It is a record anyone would be proud to discuss.”

Here are the videos:

Following a run-off vote well after midnight at last night’s convention, New Rochelle Mayor Noam Bramson handily won the Westchester County Democratic Party’s nomination to run for county executive this year. Bramson received 97,950.5 votes (54 percent) to Jenkins’ 80,249 (45 percent).

Below are video excerpts from Bramson’s acceptance speech, Jenkins’ concession speech and County Democratic Chairman Reginald LaFayette’s speech urging Democrats to work together to defeat County Executive Rob Astorino, a Republican, this fall. County Legislator Bill Ryan of White Plains, received about 14,500 votes in the first round of voting.

Astorino’s campaign released a statement after Bramson was nominated last night. The Republican Party has not held its convention yet.

“We congratulate Mr. Bramson on his nomination tonight and look forward to a healthy debate in the fall election season, based on the issues,” campaign spokeswoman Jessica Proud said. “County Executive Astorino has delivered on the promises he made to Westchester voters four years ago — like his no tax increase pledge — and he is laying the groundwork for a healthy and economically vibrant Westchester going forward. It is a record anyone would be proud to discuss.”

Here are the videos:

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4 Comments

  1. November Five on

    Jessica Proud: on Westchester County payroll full time in the County Executive office. She is one of the 60+ political hack patronage people working on his campaign sitting in County payroll jobs paid for by Westchester taxpayers. Isn’t she and the others a HUGE conflict of interest to be “campaign” spokespeople while on the County payroll?
    Come on people OPEN YOUR EYES to the corruption in Astorino’s administration !

  2. Following a run-off vote well after midnight at last night’s convention, New Rochelle Mayor Noam Bramson handily won the Westchester County Democratic Party’s nomination to run for county executive this year. Bramson received 97,950.5 votes (54 percent) to Jenkins’ 80,249 (45 percent).
    ——————————————————————————————————
    Not accurate; party nominations are made at the primary election. What Bramson won was the designation of the Westchester Democratic County Committee. He, like any other potential candidate, must still file designating petitions to run in the September primary.

  3. just the facts on

    designation is tantamount to nomination if there
    is no primary….and all contenders agreed to be
    bound by the convention…so its a semantic distinction
    although you are technically correct…

  4. Whom ever gets into office, if they really want to make a dent in the taxes, rather than blowing smoke up evryone’s (a–) by laying off the low level county/city/state workers, a sizeable amount of money could be saved by reducing the number od school districts. WHY dose Westchester County need 24 +/- school districts??? Why not bring that number done to maybe lets say 6 to 8 districts. Think of how much money could be saved and actually put some of that money towards highering more teachers and impliment better standards. Each district requires a exorbendently paid Superintendent, then there are the assistant supers or deputy supers their assistants and all of the other supporting personell deemed necessary. Then there is the building/office space and all the expenses for maintaining this office space and the infrastructure. Someone out there can put a number to this. This is a hugh waste of money